Category: Johnson

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LONG READ

Brexit: is it sustainable?

Anthony Robinson
Brexit sustainable

The nation remains divided over Brexit. Re-joining the EU is out of the question unless there is a significant majority in favour. But Brexit cannot be said to be ‘done’ until accepted by a significant majority. And how likely is that?

Stay at homes win at Hartlepool

Helen Davidson
hartlepool

Helen Davidson reviews the results in the Hartlepool by-election. Turnout was 42.3% and Conservative gains were obtained from mostly Brexit voters. Why people stayed at home and didn’t come out to vote, is unknown; but what is known is that the winner of the election was indifference.

The “duping delight” of manipulator Johnson

Anthony Robinson
Boris Johnson Manipulator

Johnson’s trademark smirk is apparently known to psychologists as “duping delight” – the sheer joy of duping people, or in the prime minister’s case, entire nations, given away by an involuntary smirk, a “leaked expression of pleasure.”

Doing his best

Steve Pottinger
Doing his best

In which the reader is invited to consider the A-Z of charges laid at the door of Prime Minister Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson.

Lies, liars and the prime minister

Andy Brown
Prime Minister Liar

Andy Brown points out that Boris Johnson is a good liar; he has lied about Northern Ireland, Brexit, and now his private life, and it has come to the point where his inability to tell the truth renders him incapable of running the country.

The Greensill scandal shows that the revolving door isn’t so transparent

Alex Toal
greensill_cameron

Alex Toal breaks down the Greensill scandal, and the broader problem of the revolving door which Cameron’s actions have highlighted. Politicians have had an uncomfortable level of closeness with the private sector for years, and the scandal is nothing new. But we need to change our incentive structures to improve practices.

The known unknowns that may decide the Johnson premiership

Alex Toal

Alex Toal examines the known unknowns that may well define the Johnson premiership: the NHS pay dispute and the return to schools. Should they fail to go to plan, knock-on effects may disrupt the local elections and hamper either his or Keir Starmer’s leadership.

Gardeners’ Question Time advises on tunnel vision

Martin Brooks

Alexander de Pfeffel seeks advice from the Gardeners’ Question Time panel and audience on his tunnel plans. “Visionary British infrastructure gardens have a great future, if only the woke gardeners, with the greatest respect to our friends and partners on the panel, weren’t so obsessed with making their doom-laden predictions that plants need to be cared for, fed, watered, protected from harsh conditions and warmly held in a loving lefty embrace if they are to survive.”

3rd Open letter to Boris Johnson

Sue Wilson

I look forward, with interest, to see what japes you might come up with next. Having a jester for a prime minister doesn’t always look wise, but it sure can be a lot of fun in these depressing times, so keep up the good work!

Johnson’s music-hall act leaves his audience cold

David Goff

Kenneth Branagh is to play the prime minister in a sky drama, set during the pandemic. I’d hesitate to give such an outstanding Shakespearian notes, but he may wish to dust off his copy of Twelfth Night. In the steward Malvolio, he’ll find an arrogant character convinced that cavorting about in an oafish manner, preferably while wearing an outlandish outfit, will win him the approval he desperately seeks.

2020 IN REVIEW

Peak stupidity and peak oil use

Andy Brown

Andy Brown looks at how humanity’s collective stupidity has peaked at the same time as its oil consumption. “The idea that the world needs to be managed with greater environmental sensitivity has much more traction with the young than the concept that we need to look backward and try to recreate a golden age that never existed.”

The end of the affair: will Britain now fall out of love with Johnson?

Andy Brown

Andy Brown asks, is Boris Johnson on the way out? The PM’s irresponsible behaviour over the past year has led to an erosion of trust, which may well be irreparable. Now, having put parliament in an impossible situation, and taken the country to the brink of no deal – in order to negotiate a very bad deal – will he lose his job as prime minister?

A CONVERSATION

“He’s following the science, mate”

Steve Pottinger

“Doing more work on your car then, Tim?” “Nope.” “But – ” “Not this time.” “Quite a few modifications there, though.” “Yep.” “So…?” “Nothing to do with me, Steve.” “Really?” “I’ve learned my lesson…” “That’s great news, Tim.”  “…and I’ve got an expert in.” “Music to my ears, Tim. Who is it?” “Spaffa.” “Spaffa??!!” “Yep, […]

What ho ho ho! Festive chums!

Alistair Cowan

But now old Father Christmas approaches, smiling and ruddy – no he doesn’t have a temperature, and his indiscriminate appetite for milk, whisky, shortbread and chocolate is not indicative of a loss of taste – and it’s time for us to let loose, relax and have a jolly old jamboree. Much like pater allowed us when the nanny stopped weeping.

The nation awaits as Johnson decides what’s best for Johnson

Andy Brown

Throughout this whole final saga of real Brexit negotiations we have only been able to be sure of one thing: whatever Boris Johnson does, will be in the best interest of Boris Johnson this week. That isn’t remotely the same thing as what is in the best interest of the British people. Either this week or for the next generation. Whichever faction of the Conservative Party gives Johnson the best chance of staying in power has been the true test of what policies he has championed.

Boris Johnson and the British public: a case of coercive control?

Dr Pam Jarvis

Dr Pam Jarvis breaks down the prime minister’s attempts to gaslight the nation, making us question our own reality. Using her background in psychology, she explains how the ‘power and control’ wheel can be used to “control their citizens by pumping out information about how people should think and behave, whilst encouraging them to judge each other against such objectives”.

Is the nation being gaslighted by another psychopath in No 10?

Anthony Robinson

With 38 days to go before the greatest instantaneous shock to our overseas trade in history, there is apparently a total void at the highest levels of government where policy direction normally starts, while we await the mercurial mind of Johnson to be made up. Psychopaths tend to lie, be socially irresponsible, disregard or violate the rights of others, cannot distinguish between right and wrong, have difficulty showing remorse or empathy, manipulate people and have problems with the law. Does this seem familiar?

A brief history of ministerial responsibility

John Cole

In the 26 years since publication of Nolan’s Seven Principles of Public Life, standards have progressively fallen – with a near-vertical plunge since Johnson became prime minister. Johnson, Cummings, Gove and the rest of the government fail the test on each of the seven principles: integrity, objectivity, accountability, honesty, openness, selflessness and leadership.